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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 88 (some duplicates have been removed)
another pope could change the rule. john paul ii is the one who put that into place. >> just speculation a lot of names being floated. who seems to be the top contenders. >> players keep changing. everybody seems to focus on an italian. he's the president of the council for culture. there's also cardinal who is the archbishop of milan. very much like pope benedict. another out of canada he hadz a powerful congregation of the bishops. also another italian president of the italian bishop's conference. >> also cardinal turkson of ghana. >> he would be the first african pope. i have been watching the video here and we have seen kind of pictures of cardinal turk son. also there's another african that has been speculated at the last conclave. he could possibly be the first african pope. now he is over 80 and chances are he won't elect him because of his age. after the pope steps down because of his aging pope at age 85 they are not going to go with an older pope. they will have someone who has stamina of running the church and also being the shepherd of souls. >> with all of the talk the first
, john paul ii, his predecessor was 85 and he could barely walk and speak. he was mumbling and he still didn't resign. and so, a pope has not resigned for 700 years, and so nobody expected really this to happen. and this to happen so soon. out of the blue, without any indications that he would make such a drastic announcement that, that came as a shock to pretty much everybody. he made the announcement in a small congregation of cardinals here in the vatican just behind me, and certainly didn't make a big speech or announcement about it meaning that even as you mentioned the spokesperson was not aware and the closest aides with were not aware so that means that the pope has made a long and thoughtful consideration of his strength and he just decided that he does not have it anymore and he wants somebody else to take his place as the leader of the world's catholics. >> all right. claudio lavanya and i know that you have a busy day and month ahead of you and even busier than you thought it would be. claudio, he of course, will be checking in a lot today and goingfogo going forth. and vati
step down. it's something that nobody's even considered in modern times. even john paul 2 who was much more ill or much more tired looking and ill, of course. he was very ill than pope benedict xvi looks and he said i had enough of this and just going to retire and read and live a spiritual life until the end and leave it with somebody younger and stamina. who that guy or pope will be, we don't know yet. we'll know soon. >> all right. thank you very much, claudio. let's bring in nbc news vatican analyst george wigle and father thomas at georgetown university. gentlemen, thank you so much for joining us. george, you have been on air all pretty much throughout the day. your initial reaction to this news, especially knowing what the pope said two years ago? >> i wasn't surprised at the fact, tamron. but i was a little surprised at the timing but the more i think about it during the day, the fact that the pope has done this in such a way that the college of cardinals will be meeting during lent, a traditional season of reflection, self examination, examination of conscious, if you will. in
benedict who stepped in and became pope after pope john paul ii, the iconic pope of the 20th century, stepped down. of course, pope john paul ii had been pope since 1979. and so, of course, his impact felt not only in the religious world but also the political world. pope benedict, though, never really, of course, given the chance to emerge from the shadows. and it seems that for a good bit of his time, he was dogged by allegations that came through the child abuse scandal throughout certainly before his reign. he was constantly being dogged by questions regarding that. but mark halperin, an iconic figure replaced by pope benedict who has had a very short tenure and now is stepping down in a way that a lot of popes don't step down before they die. >> short tenure, and it's going to be scrutinized for some of the issues you raised. to me now thinking forward, it's going to be a very big story for catholics and others around the world including the question of will it be another european? there's going to be pressure to look to another region of the country as there was last time. i th
music all day. they waited for john, paul, george, and ringo to arrive and then later, there was a performance right here in washington, d.c. >>> lawmakers in britain have passed a bill requiring every dog owner to microchip their pet. the move is designed to cut down on the more than 100,000 dogs that are lost or dumped in the u.k. every year. >> reporter: judy maguire has a tight grip on her west highland terrier. >> she's pretty g. she stays by -- pretty good. she stays by. >> reporter: but if she did run off, there's a good chance her owner would find her because she has a microchip inside her. lawmakers in england are now requiring all dogs to be fitted with a chip that's coded with their owner's details. >> i want this to have a positive impact. there are 110,000 dogs get lost every year or get dumped. only about half of them get back to their original owners. >> reporter: the mandate goes into effect in three years. owners who don't comply could be slapped with an $800 fine. many animal shelters in england will put the chip in for free. it's tiny, just the size
at the vatican. pope benedict carries the stigma of not being as popular as his predecessor, john paul ii. the monsignor of the shrine in washington puts it in perspective. >> christ was controversial. the things that jesus did. the way that he reached out to people. the way he talked to people. the types of people he talked to. it upsettle, many people. >> reporter: and tom roberts points out that pope benedict will be remembered as well for doing more to actually address the abuse scandal than his predecessor john paul ii ever did. wolf. >> as you know, pope benedict was also involved in a controversy in the united states over the actions of some american nuns. remind our viewers about this. >> reporter: that's right, not long ago, some american nuns challenged the church's teachings on home sexuality, on the male only priesthood. they supported obama's health care plan when the church spoke out against it. these nuns ended up being reprimanded. the nuns got a lot of support within the united states for their actions. it was controversial for the pope. he was also prompted to do that by
is going to resign his position. the end of the month. and, you know, he succeeded john paul ii who has rushed to make a saint. wrongly so, i think. not that he doesn't deserve it. you need some time. also the pope has said this is not the first -- not the first pope to retire. popes can retire. we are used to popes dying in. right? and most of them have. but a little quick research as we were getting ready to come on the air which is why i am not fully in uniform yet this morning. i will take care of this right now, the last pope i could find to resign was pope gregory xii. >> i don't remember him. >> bill: you wouldn't. back in the 15th century around 1415 or so there have been maybe a half a dozen popes to resign. he is the last one i could find. >> wow. >> yeah. there are a lot of explanations out there on twitter, supposedly for the vatican sort of indirectly saying it's for health reasons. he doesn't have the strength to serve in this role any more. so we don't know exactly what that means. there were rumors when he would resign when his butler wa
to function. even john john paul ii. what is it about this pope that he decided to step down? >> i think there are a couple of things going on there. with john paul ii he knew he was dying. i don't think benedict is so seriously ill that he's going to die but he could -- you know, live for another 10 years. he's got an older brother. and being in the papacy and not to be up for the job. so i think he decided that it was best for the church to go at this point and let someone else carry the burden. >> bill: now as "the new york times" says, the church is at a crossroads in the sense that where the church used to be strong, it is not so much anymore and it is in a developing world in africa and in south america and in asia where the church is showing great growth. what does that say about a future pope? >> well, there's two theories here. one is you go and find somebody from africa where the church is truly growing. on the other hand, the other theory is no, you look for someone who can deal with the problems of the church, where it has real big problems, namely europe where it is in decli
pope john paul
to do that. and that's why i think this particular move, very counterproductive. >> senators john paul and john mccain slammed the white house allegedly for leaking the plan on purpose. >> this is the prosecutor pea doing his own plan. it shows me he's really not serious. when they come out and say my way or the highway and if congress doesn't ask be with i'll put it on the desk and say pass it now, that's no way to get it done. but it seems to me to show the president really doesn't want immigration reform. >> leaks don't happen in washington by accident. this races the question that many of us continue to wonder about. does the president really want a result or does he want another reason to beat up republicans so he can get political advantage in the next election? >> he argued the white house plan and bipartisan negotiations shared some key elements. >> republican, this was leaked. it's also clear that it's incomplete. there's a silver lining in this which is that there are a lot of co commonalities between the two plans. >> was this intention by the white house to pressure congres
a tough act to follow in the wake of global adoration enjoyed by his predecessor, pope john paul ii. he rose to the occasion, travelling abroad, two dozen times, including trips to israel, the united states and lebanon. born in germany in 1947 he was forced to join the hitler youth and nazi army but deserted toward the end of the world. cardinal ratzinger had an enforcement of catholic doctrine. he was tenure include sexual abuse scandal ins the church. accused of being slow to act to resol tv problem he gained credit for how he dealt with the crisis. >> handleed it sensitively and very forth rightly amid clarity. he brought in measures to try and stamp out the coverup culture and he brought in base for people to console. >> a great goal was to bring people back to the church, as what he considered the excessive secularization. he employed skills as a writer and a teacher. >> it was incredible effective. he sounded just like a real good parish catechism teacher. combination there of great depth. same time, simplicity in explaining some of the concepts. >> while he enlisted -- elicited l
succeed pope john paul ii. >> joining us is from the school of law. >> glad to be with you. >> one of my first questions, we think about the catholic church, it's been underfire and i know that you are very concerned about the moral decline of the world in general. so, when you think about the next pope, you've got to have to have somebody who will adapt and adhere to the catholic belief system. >> that's right, and i'm confident that the conclave will pick someone like that, an extremely good successor not just to benedict, but john paul iv. ap they had the history, the back-to-back, and i think there are a lot of cardinals out there who could fill those shoes. >> since you have an accurate track record of predicting the next pope, who is in the running? >> well, i'm not sure that i actually predicted it. i hoped that he would be the choice. and-- >> that's close enough. >> i don't know. you know, at this point, i don't think there's any front runner, and i think it is really impossible to predict who it's going to be. but, obviously, you have your favorites choices. i think that las ve
the last several years of pope john paul's papacy. the poor man was so wracked with illness and kept on coming out in an ever more frail state. he hasn't canceled any engagements. we're hearing rumors that he decided no more transatlantaic travel after trips to south america. the word we're hearing is fatigue. we're going to hear conspiracy theories ranging from everything to the vatican bank to the horrible sexual scandals. pope gregory in the 1400s was forced out. it wasn't volunteer. it was like a much more pleasant version of what happened to an curry. the last time this happened was back in the 1200s so almost 700 years since this has been done voluntarily. it's really, really a shock. this had guy has always been renowned for his command of power within the vatican walls. >> listening to everything you're saying and the history there, there's got to be more behind this. it's just not a job people and you can away from, and as history has shown us, i know there are conspiracies and all. what do you think is the reason he is leaving now? >> i wouldn't want to speculate. we'll hea
. john boehner, eric cantor, and paul ryan, and paul ryan and cantor are going to keep boehner to the right. i mean, cantor and ryan's advisors have told us privately there is no opening for tax revenue in this deal at all. i'm want sure if john boehner would do it independently of them, but the people that we've seen who have been completely ineffective are the people on the house armed services committee, the people who make these decisions usually, but the chairman has not been able to sway boehner at all. we've seen the stalemate because of that, and cantor and rooen are going to keep boehner on the right. >> people outside the process are saying this is the dumbest way to do business, to have a meat ax approach and have across the board cuts. yes, it does achieve some budget savings, but does it not in any kind of intelligent way of planning. >> which is why if you talk to the people on capitol hill, the people who are making these decisions, they say that down the road if there are huge economic damages -- i mean, we don't really know what's going to happen to the economy
done in 719 years. he has decided to ab -- he was elevated to the papacy after the death of pope john paul ii. news of this is reverb rating around the country and around the world. nearly one quarter of the united states, 74 million americans, are catholic, and worldwide there are 1.1 billion members of the church. >> encompassing a range of issues from contraception to policy. the timing of the announcement comes as a surprise. just two days before ash wednesday, which marks the start of the lentin season, the holyist period on the catholic calendar. joining us from washington, the host of msnbc's "hardball" chris matthews, and contributor and washington post columnist e.j. deon. chris, my colleague, the light in the darkness on many things political. >> right. >> what do you make of this announcement coming as it does two days before ash wednesday? it seems like a major surprise. to what degree do you think the catholic church will seize on this as a moment to pivot? >> you may think so, but i don't think so. i don't think it's going to be a moment of pivot. i think it's probably p
especiy that it comes off john paul ii a man who at 85 wasn't even able to walk and neither speak really, was mumbling towards the end of his life. and pope benedict saying i just don't have it anymore. i don't have the strength anymore to bear my mission to carry on the catholic church. >> claudio, is there concern or is there some speculation that there might be more to the story than that? is there some concern that, in fact, there is some health situation we are not aware of? >> reporter: there is a concern. pope benedict xvi has always been quite weak. the vatican has always been very secretive about the health of the pope really. we don't know the extent of the health problems pope benedict xvi mate be suffering right now, but certainly or hopefully we will get to know much more during the next coming hours or days. >> and talk to me about how the process unfolds. i think a lot of us are familiar with what happens in the tragic event or unfortunate event that a pope passes away, but what would the process be like now if he has now told the world that he is resigning effective febru
. >> well said. >> amen. >> i think it shows a lot of humility. in april of 2005 when pope john paul ii died we broadcasted "hardball" from rome. as we closed our last show from there, let's listen. look at these people standing for hours, day and night, through the avenues of rome, packed together as if they had been caught and crushed in an industrial strength trash compacter. there they stood seeking no edge, plotting no photo opportunity, playing none of the games that people do in politics, in business, in so much of life. this is no pub lisible stunt or initial stock offering or inside deal or anything but the purest most obvious most grandly transparent display of individual devotion. voting with your feet. >> thanks four your wise and warm words. thanks for coming on and enl deon, mr. america and french canadian and all kind of things. >>> dick cheney from the sublime to the ridiculous. dick cheney can't stand the fact that his side lost the election, dick. that he and his neocons are under assault and in retreat thank god. he's saying president obama is picking second class people.
a couple of times. he's very warm, has sort of those kind of qualities that pope john paul did, however, there are a few other people from growing areas of the world, they'll be looking at africa and latin america. there is also cardinal ouellet from question beck. he's from a huge diocese there. and even some talk, although a long shot, of cardinal dolan at 62. he's been a cardinal for less than a year and that would argue against him, although, a lot of people questioning whether they need someone like him, who's great at dealing with the media, great evangelizer at a time when the church is facing some, frankly, competition from protestant evangelists in parts of the world like latin america and africa, thomas. >> the one and only, the incredible chris jansing reporting live from rome. you can watch chris on "jansing and co." every day right here on msnbc at 10:00 a.m. eastern. chris, thanks again. >>> as president obama addresses north korea's third nuclear test at tonight's state of the union, he's also going to have an announcement on troops, our troops in afghanistan. just a shor
all been worked out by a decree that pope john paul ii came up with maybe three years before he died, and the critical moment which is sort of an answer to your question. the criminal moment is when each cardinal has the ballot in his hands, and before he puts it in the urn, he has to repeat an oath, and you're standing in front of michelangelo's last judgment, so that wall adds always to the deal. you have this in your hand. you say something like this. i can't translate it exactly from latin. you call upon the lord jesus, my savior, as my witness. he who will judge me. you are looking at the -- he who will judge me that the man i am voting for is the one who under god i believe god wants to be pope. in a certain sense it makes it not any more an election. it makes it a discernment. you are trying to figure out what you think god would want. what man you think god would want for all the needs of the church today. it's a fascinating moment. you do it every time you vote, so it's something -- you never can forget. >> well, i never knew that before. you bring this new information that
who will be voting were appointed either by john paul ii or benedict xvi and on the big picture issues they are all of one mind. i think it's quite unlikely the next pope is going to ordain women or repeal church teaching on abortion or gay marriage or those kinds of issues. now on the other hand, i would certainly say from my own experience of talking to cardinals the more thoughtful among them realize the church has a woman's problem. they understand there are a lot of sisters who feel the same way as our guest does and it's not just nuns, lots of women generally feel that way. i think the next pope will face this difficult challenge of trying to reach out to women and assuring them there's a place for them in the church while at the same time drawing a line in the sand on the ordinary nation question. >> when you say that they're going to select the new pope and they're going to think outside the box and they're maybe going to south america or africa to choose the next pope, they're really not thinking outside the box though, are they? maybe they are in picking a pope from another c
, pope benedict xvi does have something on pope john paul ii, the catholic church experienced a 6% increase in favorability, up from 56% during pope john paul ii's tenure and that's what the survey says. >>> coming up, she beats out her husband in almost every popularity poll. now michelle obama is back on the road and we'll look at what the second term may hold for the first lady. >>> first, the latest from south africa on where the olympic star accused of murder is now a day after being released on bail. you're watching msnbc. i've always had to keep my eye on her... but, i didn't always watch out for myself. with so much noise about health care... i tuned it all out. with unitedhealthcare, i get information that matters... my individual health profile. not random statistics. they even reward me for addressing my health risks. so i'm doing fine... but she's still going to give me a heart attack. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. >>> more than 100 days after hurricane sand e some storm victims
by his predecessor john paul ii. they will look for somebody who will continue the same ol' outdated policies. with this new conclave, you may get a new face for the catholic church, but it will be the same ol' stuff. and it ain't goting to work. see you back here go ahead on monday. >> this is "the bill press show." ♪ theme ♪ stephanie: ok, then, hello happy friday, everybody. jacki sheckner had to do an emergency valentine's day intervention last night. >> yeah. stephanie: we were having a rough valentine. however, we did not just get off a carnival cruise ship. >> so you're not covered in crap. stephanie: emotionally i am. >> i did administer tough love. stephanie: that's what you're good at. >> get over it. stephanie: get off the cross somebody needs the wood. >> she always feels good calling me and then whatever, get off the phone. stephanie: i get my tough love and i know she's got other people to move on to. >> pity party we wrap it up. stephanie: we're on a schedule here. stephanie: b.f.f. in the current news center, jacki sheckner. >> president obama will welco
, and he looks frail, looks old, but he seemed to be enjoying himself. john paul ii is very much a more engaging pope and not as much as a private man as benedict xvi is. he will leave here tomorrow around this time, by helicopter, and he will go to castle gandolpho and come back to the vatican in his retirement. he'll go into isolation, he's chosen that for himself. the vatican garden cottage as it were, it's not particularly comfortable, i'm told, i haven't been in, but it is somewhere he can spend his twilight years as it were, and he's 85 years old, let's remember that, in peace and reflecting on where he is, who he is, and how far he's come. today was very much an occasion of reflection for the 100,000 or so people who were here, brooke. it was absolutely amazing. we were up there, right at vatican city there and it was a sense of quiet, even though there are over 100,000 people there, so i say, a time of reflection and peace for so many of the faith. brooke? >> and history being made and now less than 24 hours from now, where you are in rome, becky anderson, my thanks to you. >>>
the kind of italian curia that is the traditional source of popes until really pope john paul. and i think we'll end up with a similarly conservative pope. >> yeah, reverend al asked me during the commercial break what i thought. not that i would know anything about who's going to be the next pope. but one thing's for certain. given the last two popes' selection of cardinals throughout the world, they are all invariably quite conservative. so the next pope is going to, more probably than not, be similarly conservative. it's a bag job, the college of cardinals. they have rigged the deck. they have rigged the deck. >> but what you'll have, too -- >> spoken like a true catholic. >> you could have the first african pope. you could have the first latino pope. but ironically, those guys would be very conservative. you know, the growth of the church in africa is a very conservative movement. the same thing in latin america, although there's a bit of a protestant refirmation. he will be very conservative. >> everybody's talking about the possibility of an african pope. i just don't think it's goin
was standing in precisely the same place back in 2005, eight years ago when pope john paul ii died and we went into the conclave which finally produced pope benedict xvi. that took a week and several false starts. when they can't come to a consensus you have the black smoke emanating from that special chimney in st. peter's and then finally the white smoke and then you don't even know who it is until the archbishop deacon cardinals deacon comes to the window and announces a new pope and only after that the new pope comes to the within to and is greeted. but that was still at least two weeks away. at least tweaks away from that being finalized. >> is the italian media still all over the scandals that are going on involving sex and intrigue, all that stuff that we've seen in those rome newspapers over the past few days, or have they moved on? >> well, they pretty much moved on. that of course was a big story over the weekend and into monday, the beginning of this week. as you can imagine it drove the vatican mad. they were really angry, angry with the press for writing about it, angry for people
supported. it goes back really to the way you led this segment, which is with rand paul and john mccain and others talking about do the democrats want to do something or do they just want to -- they know the answer to that. the democrats passed the dream act in the house in 2010. john mccain was part of the republican filibuster against a majority of votes in the senate to advance the dream act and put it on the president's desk. there are many criticisms you can make about both parties being very opportunistic. that's what political parties are. they look for political opportunities, but we have a record here. both parties know the record. this group of democrats has done everything can you do facing obstruction to try to pass the dream act, which is stronger, according to many emgregs advocates, than what we have on the table now. >> that's because it was done by executive order, right? jose, really quickly before we let you go, are the -- the president is talking about march for immigration reform. how bullish or bearish are you on that date? >> i think by the end of the senate w
. john is right. paul ryan was against it, the president walked away from it, we could not get a bipartisan consensus for a plan that would revitalize the economy, produce growth and create jobs. it is a tragedy. >> i talked to a republican congressman why not vote for sink such and they say because of tax increases but i say you have already raised taxes, they have done that. >> the real answer they will not put the country first. how do we grow our economy? this washington game is all about their power and position and why the congress has 11 percent rating together. >> gentleman, all love to talk to you about what is going on in our country. can you get more from the political insiders every monday at 10:30 a.m. eastern and they will be back here next sunday, you can also follow them on twitter at "insiders." >>heather: a consume group is pushing the f.d.a. to put the squeeze on how much sugar goes into your favorite soft drink but is government regulation the answer? hi. hi. i'm here to pick up some cacti. it should be under stephens. the verizon share everything plan for s
to kill him? i don't know. let's go ahead and kill him. >> a question for john brennan at the cia and yes forthe other two? >> i haven't decided really. hagel has been really struggling, so -- >> thanks. >> a we'll check back in with you later. rand paul from kentucky, we'll look for you tuesday night. >>> one of two independents in the senate, a bridge builder and problem solver, questioned both john brennan and chuck hagel during confirmation hearings. not bad for a guy in office 2 3 8 da -- 38 days. angus king is up next. when you have diabetes... your doctor will say get smart about your weight. i tried weight loss plans... but their shakes aren't always made for people with diabetes. that's why there's glucerna hunger smart shakes. they have carb steady, with carbs that digest slowly to help minimize blood sugar spikes. and they have six grams of sugars. with fifteen grams of protein to help manage hunger... look who's getting smart about her weight. [ male announcer ] glucerna hunger smart. a smart way to help manage hunger and diabetes. more "likes." more tweets. so, beginning toda
another senator moving towards the hold john brennan threatening a hold, rand paul, he had not put forward a hold. we got what looks to be a political donny brook brewing and capitol hill in the united states senate. do you think that's a correct construction? >> well, i think it is. look, keep in mind, we have a constitutional obligation, not just a right, an obligation to confirm these people, and we are supposed to do this. we violate our oath if we department do it. yeah, i don't agree, and certainly, in the case of hagel, that time he's spent. you know, he was one of only two senators who refused -- who wouldn't vote for sanctions against iran. he was one of only four senators who wouldn't sign a letter of solidarity with israel. all of these things have taken place, and i think he needs to be looked at closely, and i've been opposed to him since the beginning. lou: right. senator, let me ask you, last night's state of the union address, i would be remiss nod to ask you about the president's reference to climate change, giving the congress a climate change ultimatum, vowing to act wit
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 88 (some duplicates have been removed)